“I Want THAT Look” by Paul Nobles

“I Want THAT Look” by Paul Nobles

There are two things I have changed my mind on when it comes to Eat To Perform.  The first would be recipes; I initially didn’t care for them because they can confound the issue of eating.   I believe that this whole “nutrition” thing is easy – you can always default to meats and veggies.

The second thing I changed my mind on was before and after pictures.  I felt like what we were talking about was obviously better than the alternative but I got talked into publishing before and afters, I agreed with one caveat, I would show everyone.  I wanted everyone’s journey to be represented and I think we have done a pretty good job of that.

I’m glad I changed my mind on these issues.  Food should be enjoyable and frankly, meats and veggies aren’t always fun.  Similarly, I think there are a lot of people at home that identify with the before and afters we put up and feel represented by their journey.  That’s a good thing, and it brings me to another issue – positivity when commenting on the progress of others.

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I know it gets annoying that I have to say “stay positive” for a lot of progress photo posts we put on Facebook, but people often don’t realize that what they are saying is negative.  Let me give you an example of what I mean and why I was leery of before and afters in the first place.  Before and afters basically show the progress that someone has made physically and when you are in the fat loss business I suppose that is important.  The problem is that I don’t feel like ETP is solely in the fat loss business; in fact if you were to ask me, fat loss wouldn’t be at the top of the list of the things we actually do.

That brings me to a conversation I had from this morning.  One of the people that we put up was talking to me about some of the comments she got.  The gist was basically like this “Well, I really like her shoulders but I would rather not have those arms.” as if the two could be molded to perfection just so the random commenter could have an aesthetic to aspire towards.

What she said to me about these types of comments rang in my ears immediately and it’s the EXACT reason I was hesitant to post before and afters in the first place.  Eat To Perform is not about aesthetics first – it’s about a mental approach to eating that allows for you to become the most capable version of yourself.  By putting performance first things come in line real fast.  The woman I was talking to has been posting about a challenge she is doing with her family that is activity-related (on her personal page).  It’s fun and the whole family is having a great time.  Amazingly, when you are eating adequate amounts of food and sleeping well, you feel a bit more up for just about anything.

Eat To Perform is about you becoming the best version of yourself mentally, not just physically.  As someone that lost a hell of a lot of body fat at one point I can tell you personally that the end-game isn’t nirvana.  You don’t suddenly look in the mirror one day and go “Nailed it!”  RESULTS for one person don’t look like results for another – everybody is different!  The best place to start is being happy with who you are now.  That person can start eating better today, doing more today, enjoying life today.

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THAT IS WHAT EAT TO PERFORM IS ABOUT!

Look, if you want to keep buying the bullshit ads about “The 5 Foods That Will Kill Your Metabolism” by Dr. I.  Will Sellyouanything, go right ahead…but all that stuff is fool’s gold.  The reason people fall for those “quick tips” is because they are looking for something that doesn’t exist.

Which brings me back to my original point; people that are happy with themselves don’t say things like “Her shoulders or too big.” or “He clearly skips leg day.”  I have always considered jealousy to be the product of something someone wants but can’t achieve.  As a general rule I am pretty happy for others and their accomplishments, mostly because I focus on myself and the things I am working towards.  While I may never dunk on a 10 foot rim or squat 1,000 pounds, I am secure enough in myself to appreciate the people who CAN do that.